Monday, December 7, 2009

today, INTERN's heart is fluttering with suspense

News, news!

INTERN might (fingers crossed) be doing ANOTHER INTERNSHIP starting in February! YAAAAAAAAAAAAY! This time, instead of the sleek modern confines of Big Fancy Publishing House, she would/will be gleefully toiling in the more sedate, polished headquarters of a distinguished old publisher to be referred to henceforth by the code name Venerable McPulitzer.

All has not gone smoothly on INTERN's road to renewed interning. There have been snags. Very telling snags:

After a delightful e-mail repartee with one of the editors at V. McP, a phone interview was arranged for last Friday. INTERN rang up said editor at the appointed time and her extension was answered by a very professional-sounding intern who informed INTERN that the editor (who has this frightening name—something along the lines of "Isadora Sharkskin" but more intimidating) was still in a meeting and would call INTERN back in half an hour.

INTERN waited next to her phone for the next hour, jotting down increasingly paranoid and inane notes-to-self in case she froze up during the phone conversation and forgot who her favorite authors were or why she was interested in Venerable McPulitzer. After an hour and fifteen minutes, INTERN started to get even more anxious, because now it was getting on one o'clock and she had to be at a life drawing gig at one thirty.

So INTERN called again and this time spoke to a different intern, who asked INTERN to hold and assured her that this editor would come to the phone in a minute.

Ten minutes of holding later and INTERN is practically vomiting with nervousness. The intern comes back on the line and tells INTERN to wait for another ten minutes. INTERN yelps that she can't wait another ten minutes! She has to sprint down to this obscure warehouse and pose for a secretive coven of artists and sculptors wearing only a fedora!

The intern does not seem to understand INTERN's predicament, possibly because INTERN is babbling about having to get to her "day job" at an extremely high speed.

Finally, the intern tells INTERN that the editor will be in a meeting all afternoon and to call back on Monday. INTERN hangs up and flees to an afternoon of life-modeling and piano whispering. Groceries get bought.

Now it is Monday and INTERN just received a phone call from yet another intern who spoke as if INTERN had already been accepted for the internship. So was that whole thing with the "interns" and the interminable "meeting" actually some kind of warped interview in itself? Was INTERN being tested for coolness and resolve? Were all those interns actually Isadora Sharkskin herself putting on voices? And if not, when will INTERN speak with the real Isadora Sharkskin?

This internship (IF INDEED INTERN HAS IT) does not start until February. So there are still fifty-odd sleeps until INTERN is back in her element.

In the meantime, INTERN would like to know, from any readers who care to reveal themselves: What is your day job? And, How much do you dig it?

81 comments:

  1. My day job is in television syndication, and I dig it muchly. While there isn't much room for creativity in the job itself, I work with some fantastic people and have the freedom to do things like read INTERN's blog in my downtime. ;)

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  2. My day job is in television syndication, and I dig it muchly. While there isn't much room for creativity in the job itself, I work with some fantastic people and have the freedom to do things like read INTERN's blog in my downtime. ;)

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  3. My day job is unemployed attorney. I'm a tad cranky about that. But if anyone wants to come by my blog and wish me a happy birthday today, that would surely cheer me up!

    Congrats on the newest INTERNING gig!

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  4. Transcribing doc/reality TV shows. Pros: paid to watch TV; work from home; uniform is pajamas; sometimes I learn stuff. Cons: carpal tunnel; lack of sunshine.

    As a to-pay-the-bills-while-I-write-my-novel job, it rocks. Because otherwise it sucks and it motivates me to write, write, write so I'm not still transcribing when I'm old and unmarketable.

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  5. I am an attorney. I only dig it sometimes. You're too talented a writer to go to law school.

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  6. Wow... That sounds completely nervewrecking. I'm not sure if you're the type, but me, I would be fingernail-biting through this whole process...

    As for my day job, I absolutely adore it (when I'm not completely annoyed by the people said job requires me to deal with). I work at a University, in Administration, dealing with International Scholarships, Student and Teachers Exchange Programs as well as International Students admissions etc. Those are the facts.

    The Jane Version:
    In areas mentioned above, I AM the LAW. What I say goes, because I Know what I'm talking about. If students or Professors wish to get a different answer and call Powers That Be to ask their question, they hear exactly the same thing, because Powers That Be call me to confirm.

    And, well. I have an Intern of my own. And I'm considering getting her a collar for she is mine and I wish to keep her.

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  7. I'm SOOOOOOOO happy for you!!!!!

    Plus, this means you won't be tempted to halt your blog activities in favor of something more goaty.

    Congratulations!!!!! You deserve it!!!
    :-)

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  8. My day job was -- and soon will be again -- journalist! If I didn't totally dig it, I wouldn't do it.

    I believe this is the first time I've commented on your blog... Thanks for some interesting reading.

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  9. My day job is in the art department at an animation/design studio. I also do children's books and illustration freelance. Oddly enough, the children's books are waaay edgier than anything I do at the day job, but I still dig it.

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  10. I hope you get it!

    I work as a film buyer for my day job. We are like the middle(wo)men between film studios and movie theaters. We then help them decide which movies would be best for their screens, book the movies for them, and then fight with the film companies to get the best possible rental terms for the theaters. Yeah, that's right: when a film is played at the cinema, the theater is renting it from the studio, and has to pay (sometimes A LOT) for it.

    How much do I dig it? I LOVE my job. As much as I dream about being able to write full-time, I will be very sad to leave this job when the time comes.

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  11. Congrats! Or.... maybe congrats? Despite the confusion, I'm looking forward to another round of your interning. I miss my intern days, slush pile and all.

    By day, I'm office manager at a Esteemed University Newspaper. I work with four other "adults" (quotation marks for me, not them) and 200+ college students. Plenty of fodder for writing YA. But yes, as bill-paying jobs go, this one is fabulous, and I really enjoy it.

    [Ducks to avoid tomatoes thrown by envious cubicle toilers.]

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  12. INTERN
    I used to teach city college and at first loved having TOO MUCH free time and so didn't mind never having QUITE ENOUGH money. So then I went into full time work, and spent the last three years trying to find the answer to how does one happily work full time and still prioritize writing and making art. Now, I love my job. My answer? Well -- not sure. But I do know the following: good people, repetitive tasks that are not too easy and not too hard (leaving plenty of free brain time while at work), close to home, solid pay and long lunches; all these factors seemingly contribute...

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  13. Congrats! Hope it all happens smoothly from here.

    My day job is mothering and even though I LOVE to write, being a Mom is most definitely the most rewarding day-night-and-every-other-moment job I've ever had.

    I'm not just changing a life. I'm molding it.

    Cool, scary, fun, tiring...all bases covered!

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  14. Good luck with the internship!

    In my day job, I am a SQL Server DBA (really, don't ask). It's a geek job. It's OK as day jobs go. But I would rather be writing full time. Don't tell.

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  15. I have a few day jobs. Yay. Preschool teacher (arts and crafts and herding cats. Er, I mean two-year-olds.), Handbell Choir Director, Sunday School teacher (yes, my church PAYS - woot), and Creative Memories Consultant (basically a hobby paying for itself).

    These are all okay. On a scale of 1-10, teaching's about a 6, directing a 7, and CMC's an 8. I'd prefer to stay home and write, but I also like to eat...and feed my children. :-)

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  16. The Day Job(TM):

    I am a consultant. Specifically, a researcher and business analyst in the field of information technology.

    This consists mainly of my client(s) paying me money to tell them "don't do that, I already tried that and it is a load of epic fail."

    I love my job. I love it very much. I actually say things like "Epic Fail," "Impending Technological Armageddon" and the ever popular and underused "This is whacked."

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  17. I'm hoping it was indeed a devious intern test and you passed with flying interns!

    As for my dayjob.... I'm a call quality and compliance administrator, so I listen to customer service and sales call all day and judge people. It's not so much fun as.. well, yeah. But hey, it feeds me!

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  18. ...Think everyone is hiding. Or unemployed.

    I am a student, and currently in the second category. But sort of not. A PhD is a job, right? Before that I was a coffee-moppet.

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  19. Well, that should solve your blogging identity crisis. Fingers crossed.

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  20. It used to be high tech consultant, and I loved it. Now, it is "mom" and I also love it, though it's incredibly more demanding and the PTO plan stinks.

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  21. My old (making money & career) day job was for a software company working with an agricultural commodity. I LIKED the clients - and the job itself. I LOATHED the management.

    My current job (due to downsizing) is looking for a new job. The management is TERRIFIC, however the pay is less than desirable. On the side, I have a part time cooking gig. I <3 the creative aspect of this - not so thrilled with the crazy I feel like I'm back in college hours. :)

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  22. My old (making money & career) day job was for a software company working with an agricultural commodity. I LIKED the clients - and the job itself. I LOATHED the management.

    My current job (due to downsizing) is looking for a new job. The management is TERRIFIC, however the pay is less than desirable. On the side, I have a part time cooking gig. I <3 the creative aspect of this - not so thrilled with the crazy I feel like I'm back in college hours. :)

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  23. This particular reader's day job is as a bookseller (read: bullet-stopper) for an evil corporation that does not seem to much like its employees right now. But hopefully, soon, I will find an agent for my book and be a fabulously wealthy early retiree. < / irony >

    Ahh, life as book-people. So glamorous.

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  24. Wow, this post makes me want to recommend anti-skitzophrenia meds to INTERN :P j/k

    Sounds to me like this could have been a test, just like INTERN thought. I wonder what INTERN's grade will be?

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  25. Day job = Project manager at specialty construction firm.
    Like it? = It pays the bills. And isn't boring. Enough of a win to keep me going.

    Good luck landing the next internship, good lady. At the very least, your blog title will remain current...

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  26. My day job: full-time author type.

    How much do I dig it: The hours are good, but the pay is lousy and my co-workers are not just annoying but me.

    Here's hoping you get the internship, tho' it'd be nice to see you getting paid one of these days.

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  27. I'm a neuroscience grad student, which has actually been helpful for getting publicity for my Neuroscience and Creative Writing blog . Perhaps I'll start wearing a fedora at my day job too. But I'll have to wear more than that -- don't want to freak out the research participants.

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  28. Dear intern,
    I used to be an event planner for a small cooperative grocery story. I loved my job. It was like being the ring master at a circus, but instead of wild animals, I herded Indy musicians and told kids to get out of the trees. I loved my job so much it kept me from writing and painting, my stated life-love/goals. Then, one day, after a long winter hiatus of no events, I picked up a heavy box and my back said, “oh, no, this is over,” and it was. Now, I hate my desk job, but I spend much more time writing and painting. And every once in a while, I long to be back in that spotlight telling those scruffy guys in faded jeans that the beer is not free and those truculent children that the trees belong to me and no, you cannot climb them.

    So, I hope you find a job you hate and that you spend all your time writing passionately, but if you’re really, really lucky you’ll find a job you love and it will tear you apart when you can’t do it anymore or when you decide to move on to something else (better).

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  29. My day job is as an Assistant Curator with a gloriously paid internship. I am sure you are aware that when an intern has an unexpectedly excellent position title preceded by "Assistant," then it might be more accurate to say something along the lines of "___ Pig." Artifact Pig or Exhibit Pig would be pretty accurate for me, until my recent exhibit design project started.

    I dig it pretty well, thanks.

    And, not to scare you or anything, but I've heard of malicious interns trying to secure themselves a continuation by sabotaging prospective intern's chances...

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  30. I am so thoroughly jealous that you even got an interview. I have been applying to publishing jobs for way too long than I care to admit with not even a whisper from the publishing houses. Admittedly, I want a job. (I've already done the internship) Even so...I'm jealous. Here's crossing my fingers for you.

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  31. My day job is more of a waking job, from bed rise to bed fall, whenever the paying work comes in, it gets done. In between, there's writing, revising, editing, research, grazing and browsing for agents, publishers and their submission guidelines, new tech, old tech, publishing tech, stories to read, interpret, understand, glean from. And when the Muse, Diane for my muse, strikes, tasks a different creativity media, I do a little wood or pottery craft, take a walk on the salt river clay banks nearby, catch some meat, beach comb or just take in the splendor of nature in the wildness of its rawness.

    Oh, my telecommuter paying gig is copyediting and/or proofreading transcripts. Legal arena, corruption in places high and low, greed, adversarial jurisprudence, homicide, humankind's inhumanity to humankind, domestic and family relations in all its ugliest, personal injury, municipal hearings.

    I dig it, it's at my timely convenience, an inside glimpse at all the sorrow and misery of human existence, and it all leads to the writing/reading/editing core, as all roads lead to Rome.

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  32. I'm a university writing teacher. It's like having my own little fiefdom/dictatorship. (This infers a deep love. Just FYI.)

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  33. I'm a novelist. It's okay. Scraping by.

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  34. I make e-cards. It's ok I guess, except for the holes the computer has burned in my eyes. I'd rather be painting.

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  35. Telecommuting, baby! I work from home as a researcher, and now I've written a novel (& am halfway through a second) based on my research experiences, like the time I found myself trapped in a medieval archive with a crazy old man and a couple from Poland!

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  36. I teach writing to college freshman, and I LOVE it. I detest the grading, but I enjoy interacting with students, seeing that light turn on, and being in front of a class. I was born to teach.

    Trust me though, it's a calling. If you're not called to education, PLEASE don't do it. There are so many angry, bitter educators because they took the job by default, and they hate their life.

    But. If you have a passion for passing on knowledge, and you like discussion and interaction (not to mention summers off and breaks at Christmas and spring), teaching may be just the thing. All you need to do it part-time is an M.A. in English and lots o' patience.

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  38. Congrats!!! Crossing my fingers that it all goes through without a hitch. My day job is writing for a gossip website. I dig it very much.

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  39. I'm a teacher, and I've been teaching full-time for fifteen years. I absolutely love the teaching--the standing up in front of the class and doing my song and dance, or helping kids one-on-one after school. I absolutely hate the grading, the paperwork, the lack of spare time, the constant feeling of being behind, the paperwork, the grading, the meaningless inanities that must appear on lesson plans to please people who never look at them anyway, the politics, the makework, the starting work at 7:10, the paperwork, and the grading. Enough that in the morning--especially Monday morning--I am filled with sadness and dread.

    And then I get up in front of my kids and remember again how much I love teaching.

    As far as I'm concerned, I teach for free. I get paid to do that other stuff.

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  40. WHOA! Now, just one buckled-up minute there... Wearing only a fedora? Who? You? Or the wannabe window peepers who pay for nakeditity so they won't get arrested?

    Haste yee back ;-)

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  41. I work at a coffee shop. I hated it for a whole summer and grumbled constantly about being a college graduate who makes people coffee (outside of my publishing internship, at which, contrary to popular belief, I made no coffee). Then I realized how relaxed and fun the people I work with are. Now I love it. Unfortunately, it still doesn't pay the rent.

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  42. Translator but then I just got my degree in that field, so I really can't complain. :)

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  43. I'm a technical writer-- officially. But blogging is what I do for fun. I'm better at blogging then writing bullshit jingles and marketing copy-- trying to make some fucking cheap plastic spatula sould exciting like it's going to give you an orgasm as soon as you buy it. I think my blog is going to be my salvation.

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  44. Congratulations! I'm excited for you to begin your regularly scheduled interning once again.

    My day "job" is a student in clinical psychology. That includes paying enormous sums of money to go to class, take exams, and write papers. In addition, I'm required to work (unpaid) at a psychological hospital 3 days a week as a student therapist. Also, there's a bunch of other hoops I go through. Despite the vast amount of money I lose each year, I LOVE it! I happily look forward to the day I can stop jumping the hoops and start getting paid.

    As you may have guessed, my on-the-side, also-not-getting-paid-for hobby is writing.

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  45. I intern with Renowned O'Venerable. He is a cool dude. But, you have a book coming out! One which you are sketchy about! Much as we love INTERN, do you have a need for interning? Srsly?

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  46. I know it's supposed to be top sekrit and all that, but I'll step forward and reveal my true identity as a professional mother of 5 children who range in age from 7-13. (That's right, I get to profess that I'm a professional and nobody in the grown-up world questions me. Feel the power.) There was no internship to prepare me for this, however, but since no two days are ever alike, it probably wouldn't have done any good anyway. I'm in it for the long haul, and frankly, it's the best job in the whole world, and one of the few things I would never give up or trade for anything. Good luck with the new internship. Hope you got it.

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  47. My day job involves filling out paper applications I turn in once a month to the same establishments. Cruising the 3 closest cities craigslist job sections, praying for something I'm qualified for.

    Preparing for my own internship, where I will instill the love of books into 7 year olds. Work appropriate attire was found, and paid for without my meager funds.

    And presently, avoiding studying for my finals. A Bachelor's/Master's degree seemed like a good plan for a couple where both partners have been laid off.

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  48. I'm a translator and interpreter for Spanish and Portuguese. I like it, mostly. Except when I have difficult clients (i.e. today). But yeah...it's rewarding, it's varied, and it pays the bills. Just...no health insurance. :-/

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  49. Day job is as generic indy bookstore person. I dig it muchly.

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  50. THANK YOU everyone for commenting so generously! It inspires INTERN so much to think of all the different things people are doing in the world...like reading a Richard Scarry book about a very busy town where all the creatures wear top hats and bow ties...

    INTERN decided to pursue another internship because a) she is too cheap to go to grad school but still wants to learn stuff and b) would rather be an intern at a really awesome, ultimate publisher than have a "real job" at a publisher that doesn't interest her. And yeah, living up to this blog's title again will be a bonus : P

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  51. Good luck! I love your blog and look forward to more interesting insights from the publishing industry!

    As to my day job, I'm currently a full time student, working on my bachelors' degrees (political science and Mideast studies). I graduate in April, though, but before that, I'll be interning with a foreign policy think tank in Washington DC for the spring semester.

    Where will that lead? I have absolutely no idea. But I am considering dropping everything for a year or two and moving to Jordan or Syria, teaching English to pay the bills. Maybe over there I'll finally get some serious writing done...

    ...but seriously, I have no idea what I'm going to do after graduation (besides keep writing, of course!)

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  52. The job I get paid for is tutoring English to American high schoolers in Germany. Kids are cool and the location's nice. Pay sux.

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  53. Day job is in a museum. Currently an office monkey, but come April I'm back in the trenches, dressing as a Victorian, playing with 400 year old swords, and baking tudor pies. I miss the trenches!

    Since reading this blog, I've actually being trying to eye up internships, but there's almost no publishers where I live, let alone publishers offering internships. I'm now eyeing up e-publishers, to see if anyone's looking for slush readers.

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  54. Full time barista @ coffee bean. YA writer in free time. 25. I dig it, except I get sore feet. It beats admin for some random company, staring at a computer screen all day and getting fat. Free coffee + fresh eyes when I get home. Win/win.

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  55. Dear intern,

    Congratulations that is fantastic news.

    I have a day job as a marketing Manager for a publishing company. Sometimes great sometimes dull as hell!

    Kate xx
    http://secretofficeconfessions.blogspot.com/

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  56. I teach English to Italians. I really like it, most of the time. Before that I was a sports journalist and political public relations writer.

    About your interview, there are two obvious possibilities: 1. they were playing mind games with you or 2. they were very busy and quite disorganized that day. I'd be hoping for the second. But if they are going to practise what one of my friends calls "psychological terrorism", I think you can probably handle it. You might even have fun and get some good blog fodder out of it.

    Good luck and keep blogging.

    Caroline

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  57. Technogeek. Love it to death.

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  58. I make computer chips. They are nice to me here and treat me like I'm intelligent and I have 3 and 4 days off every week to write.

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  59. Family Support Specialist--or more lay-termish, an advocate for children and families in the court system.

    Also a mom.

    LOVE them both more than a salt-rimmed margarita in the Carribean!

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  60. I'm a software developer by day...only because my wife and I didn't pay attention during health class--particularly the part about where babies come from. By the time we were "in the know", we had four mouths to feed and piling bills. Since the "starving artist" routine would only draw the unwanted attention of state agencies, I was forced to give up my dreams of the arts in lieu of the financial security that technology offered. Now that they're older and starvation is considered a healthy form of weight loss (at least, amongst my daughters), I figured I would try to ease my foot into the door of publishing to see if I can make a dream or two a reality.

    Do I like being a techno-geek? I'm good at it, and it serves its purpose...that's about it. Of course, if modeling in a fedora had been an option back then and guaranteed to pay the bills, I could very well have opted for that instead. I'm really not very picky...

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  61. I'm a translator. It annoys me a lot when the texts are boring and technical, but I do occasionally get great satisfaction when I take a text that was badly written in the original German and transform it into a very much smoother English one. Trouble is, my German clients won't ever realise it!

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  62. Veterinarian. I can't do it full-time, but part-time ROCKS. The only downside is part-time makes the money really tight. Upside: time to write. I've published two novels and I'm raising the bar: Writing novels that will actually earn royalties.

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  63. By day I am an IT sevice manager in the BC Provincial Government. Like most things in life it has its plus points, and its *ahem* challenges. It is great when I'm able to use my connections to bring the right people together to solve a problem, and I can honestly say I've never had a boring day there!

    Many (hopeful) congratulations on your not-quite-certain-yet new internship. But what happened to your earlier dreams of llama herding or whatever it was?

    IanB

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  64. Day job: Editor. I'm betting posing in only a fedora pays better. ;-)

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  65. Records clerk. But I'd rather be writing.

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  66. Marketing coordinator for one of those Big Fancy Publishers. Very much love it, but wish I could work with some books I'd actually read (I am not a huge industrial chemistry fan, although I'm sure these textbooks I advertise are quite, er, informative).

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  67. I work at a gym, front desk. I never really dig it, but most days I appreciate it. Lately I have been ambivalent, though: it now helps grow the spending-2010-in-Canada fund, which is great, but it also deprives me of time that has only become more precious as the departure time comes closer.

    Anyway, good luck and congrats!

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  68. INTERN--

    I love your blog! Thanks for writing with so much umph each time. I, too, used to be a lowly intern at an established, well-known publishing company--I would like to know how you deal with all the mail-sending and busywork you have to put up with! I unfortunately don't have the mindset for it and chose, as you put it, a "real job" at a publisher that doesn't interest me rather than yet another unpaid internship at a place that *could be* awesome but most likely would treat me like dirt! (When I'm so much more!)

    Day job: Copyeditor. (Note: I GREATLY appreciated your post about copyeditors! We are so underappreciated.)

    Side job (that pays almost nothing monetarily but so so much fulfillment-wise): Assistant Editor for an amazing, FUN publishing company!

    Good luck with this next internship. I would find it very odd if they were playing mind games on you; probably they were just busy that day and disorganized. (In which case.. get ready for a not-so-fun internship??) I hope they weren't testing you, at least. That would be so mean.

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  69. Intern, remember the bit you did on the heartbroken teenage boy who poured his woes into song on a stage, on Amature Night?

    I teach those hormone-driven kids. I read their heartbroken poetry, and I compliment them on their courage for putting their feelings into word-form. I never criticize without also offering words of encouragement.

    And I feel very blessed to do what I do. In some small way, I'm taking one for the team.

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  70. I'm one of those graduate school people.

    I teach Sophomore Technical Writing (pain! as I'm a creative writer!) and write news stories for the Dean's Office.

    I like teaching, I hate my subject, and I'm getting tired of writing articles about "exciting, cutting edge research by Mid-Size- Texas University!"

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  71. First off Intern, I love your blog, its fantastic.

    Second, I hope you get your new internship and things go really well for you!

    Third-my day job is a spiritually fulfilling, though not financially fulfilling one. I work for the city council providing medical equipment to those in need, for free (or rather, paid for by things like Council Tax and national insurance). It's an often frustrating job, but in general, I like doing it because I feel I'm doing something good for people (the only job I've ever had where I could say that).

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  72. I'm a magazine editor. Specifically, for the international editions of Cosmopolitan in Western Europe, South Africa, Brazil, and parts of Asia. Today, as part of a work project, I spent most of my day Google image-ing the following keywords: "George Clooney laughing" "Brazilian wax" "sex on fire" and "Michael Jackson jacket and skinny jeans." The phrase NSFW does not exist here.

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  73. Dayjob, and I mostly dig it, when I don't have to mark essays: English Literature TA at university level.

    And I love your blog.

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  74. I'm a rocket scientist with an esteemed, but down on its luck national space agency. About every six months I get to see some waaay cool fire and smoke and the rest of the time I sit in meetings. Sometimes in the meetings we get to see pretty pictures, but mostly we talk about things like whether the dust covers for the service valves need to have lanyards or not.

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  75. I'm a literary agent for Unnamed Literary Agancy and can relate the what I call the editor run-around. Good luck in your new internship!!

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  76. This has been so fun! Twice the normal fun of reading your post dear Intern. Reading all these job descriptions really feels like meeting a lot of people at a party! Me? Oh I work for a large corporation, but am close to completing my life coaching certification. Next to writing my stories, coaching other people is my biggest joy and interest. Best of luck to you all! Thanks for allowing me to get to know you a little.

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  77. Children's Librarian. Best job ever.

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  78. I'm an accounts manager by day, and I dig that it doesn't zap me creatively and pays the bills nicely. =)

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  79. There's a movement to radically change California government, by getting rid of career politicians and chopping their salaries in half. A group known as Citizens for California Reform wants to make the California legislature a part time time job, just like it was until 1966.
    www.onlineuniversalwork.com

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  80. There's a movement to radically change California government, by getting rid of career politicians and chopping their salaries in half. A group known as Citizens for California Reform wants to make the California legislature a part time time job, just like it was until 1966.
    www.onlineuniversalwork.com

    ReplyDelete